Kara Rosenlund in the desert of Namibia

Updated: Oct 1

All images ©Kara Rosenlund

That an artist can inspire the indigenous way of living comes vividly alive by the photography of Kara Rosenlund and her trip to the barren yet rich plains of Namibia. Her highlight was spending time with the Himba tribeswomen and being in their presence.



Himba tribeswomen

"A single week doesn’t go by when I’m not reminded by last years incredible trip to Namibia. It truly was extraordinary" writes Kara Rosenlund on her website. Her highlight was spending time with the Himba tribeswomen and being in their presence.









Otjize

The Himba are indigenous peoples with an estimated population of about 50,000 people living in northern Namibia. The women are famous for rubbing their bodies with otjize, a mixture of butter fat and ochre, believed to protect their skins against the harsh climate. The red mixture is said to symbolize earth's rich red color and the blood that symbolizes life.






A whole village lives within that fenced timber ring, with their livestock at the foot of the mountains in the sand. So isolated and unspoilt, like the land that time forgot.


Namibia is such a vast land, it’s one of the least populated countries on the globe. Everything from the Himba huts made from sticks and animal dung, to the tribeswomen who spoke no English – yet Karla and they ‘spoke’ for hours together – to the beautiful handmade jewellery which adorn their necks, wrists and ankles.


Kara loved it all.







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